There is a new Raspberry Pi 3 in the house

770a5614-2Just in time for Pi day, the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is announced as the top-of-the-line Raspberry Pi . They’ve boosted both processing speed and network capabilities, while keeping the price the same as the older model.

The new board shares many of the same specs as its predecessor (that came out over two years ago), but brings the processor speed up to 1.4GHz — about a 15% increase.

They’ve also added support for dual-band 802.11b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi — effectively almost tripling the Wi-Fi throughput of the base Pi 3 and the have improved the wired performance as well.

Wireless performance

Tx bandwidth (Mb/s)

Rx bandwidth (Mb/s)

Raspberry Pi 3B 35.7 35.6
Raspberry Pi 3B+ (2.4GHz band) 46.7 46.3
Raspberry Pi 3B+ (5GHz band) 102 102

 

Wired performance

Tx bandwidth (Mb/s)

Rx bandwidth (Mb/s)

Raspberry Pi 3B 94.1 95.5
Raspberry Pi 3B+ 315 315

They also stated “We will shortly launch a PoE HAT which can generate the 5V necessary to power the Raspberry Pi from the 48V PoE supply.” That should add some flexibility for those interested in PoE.

I think I have 3 Raspberry Pi’s around the house doing various functions. Now I’ll have to find another reason to buy one.

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Adding more complex triggers with IFTTT to control your home IoT

IoT HomeI have been using IFTTT for quite a while with my various IoT devices, doing simple things like turning on lights when my garage door opens or when there is motion near my home. One of the great things about IFTTT is its simplicity. If ‘this’ triggering event happens, do ‘that’. This simplicity is also one of the frustrating limitations of doing more complex tasks.

If I want to only turn on the porch lights when it is dark out, but keep them off when it is light, there is no way to do that natively within the system. They have thought about expansion capabilities through the ability to send and receive information from websites that can provide stateful information – IFTTT supports both trigger and response through a capability called webhooks. There are some free services to support this capability that you can experiment, if you don’t want to bring up your own website.

The one I looked at is: apilio.io and there is a good explanation of it on Medium. It is still in beta though.

Apilio has three building blocks:

  • Variables – to contain state information
  • Conditions – to evaluate variables
  • Logicblocks – to determine the actions from a Boolean analysis of the conditions

As an example, I decided to use Apilio with IFFF to turn my lights on when there was motion in front of my house but only when it is dark out. To accomplish this, I had to perform the following steps:

  1. Configure your IFTTT webhook connection on your webhooks settings/documentation page in IFTTT and enter that key into your Apilio profile. This key enables a secure connection between the website and IFTTT.
  2. Next define the variables in Apilio where you would like to store state information. In my case, I created a Boolean variable darkOutside. Note that there are URLs that when accessed will set the variable to True or False. You’ll need these URLs in the next step.
  3. Define two IFTTT rule Applets that set the variable to True at sunset and False at sunrise, using the capabilities of the Weather Underground trigger supported by IFTTT.
  4. Define a condition in Apilio that if darkOutside is True then it returns true, otherwise False. I named it DarkOutsideCondition
  5. Next, I made an Apilio logicblock that performs a simple logical AND operation that if it is triggered and the DarkOutsideCondition is True, it triggers applets back in IFTTT. I called the logicblock lights_on_when_dark. It has a URL to force its evaluation (from the logicblock show command) and a place to store a IFTTT trigger event name, if it is evaluated. One for True (called LightsOn) and another for when it is evaluated False (called LightsOff).
  6. Since I have a Ring doorbell with motion sensing that interfaces with IFTTT, I made an IFTTT Applet for when motion is sensed to initiate the evaluation trigger of the logicblock lights_on_when_dark.
  7. Now I just needed to create 2 more Applets, one to turn on the lights if it gets a webhook event called LightsOn and another if IFTTT gets the webhook event LightsOff that turn the lights on accordingly.

This may seem a complex but really only consists of:

  • a variable, a condition and a logicblock in Apillio
  • five applets in IFTTT:
    • set the darkOutside variable to true at sunset
    • set the darkOutside variable to false at sunset
    • receive a LightsOff trigger and turn the lights off
    • receive a LightsOn trigger and turn the lights on
    • catch the Ring motion sensor trigger and force and evaluation of the lights_on_when_dark logic block.

This is a fairly simple example. There are also some additional examples on the Apilio site, but hopefully this walkthrough will help you get started with enough context to overcome some of the areas that confused me.

I also have a IFTTT applet to turn the lights off at sunrise, just so there is another way to turn the lights off. I should have the ability to add some delay sensing so that I can turn the lights off after they have been on for a defined period (say a half hour), to keep my energy costs down.

NIST standards draft for IoT Security

IoTThe draft version of NIST’s “Interagency Report on Status of International Cybersecurity Standardization for the Internet of Things (IoT)” was  released this week and is targeted at helping policymakers, managers and standards organizations develop and standardize IoT components, systems and services.

The abstract of this 187 page document states: “On April 25, 2107, the IICS WG established an Internet of Things (IoT) Task Group to determine the current state of international cybersecurity standards development for IoT. This Report is intended for use by the IICS WG member agencies to assist them in their standards planning and to help to coordinate U.S. government participation in international cybersecurity standardization for IoT. Other organizations may also find this useful in their planning.”

The main portion of the document is in the first 55 pages with a much larger set of annex sections covering definitions, maturity model, standards mappings… that will be likely of great interest to those strategizing on IoT.

The document is a great starting point for organizations wanting an independent injection of IOT security perspectives, concerns and approaches. My concern though is the static nature of a document like this. Clearly, this Information Technology area is undergoing constant change and this document will likely seem quaint to some very quickly but be referenced by others for a long time in the future. A wiki version may make this more of a useful, living document.

Comments on the draft are due by April 18. Reviewers are encouraged to use the comment template, and NIST will post comments online as they are received.

Six thoughts on mobility trends for 2018

mobility walkLet’s face it, some aspects of mobility are getting long in the tooth. The demand for more capabilities is insatiable. Here are a few areas where I think 2018 will see some exciting capabilities develop. Many of these are not new, but their interactions and intersection should provide some interesting results and thoughts to include during your planning.

1. Further blurring and integration of IoT and mobile

We’re likely to see more situations where mobile recognizes the IoT devices around them to enhance contextual understanding for the user. We’ve seen some use of NFC and Bluetooth to share information, but approaches to embrace the environment and act upon the information available is still in its infancy. This year should provide some significant use cases and maturity.

2. Cloud Integration

By now most businesses have done much more than just stick their toe in the cloud Everything as a Service (XaaS) pool. As the number of potential devices in the mobility and IoT space expand, the flexibility and time to action that cloud solutions facilitate needs to be understood and put into practice. It is also time to take all the data coming in from these and transform that flow into true contextual understanding and action, also requiring a dynamic computing environment.

3. Augmented reality

With augmented reality predicted to expend to a market somewhere between $120 and $221 billion in revenues by 2021, we’re likely to see quite a bit of innovation in this space. The wide range of potential demonstrates the lack of a real understanding. 2018 should be a year where AR gets real.

4. Security

All discussions of mobility need to include security. Heck, the first month of 2018 has should have nailed the importance of security into the minds of anyone in the IT space. There were more patches (and patches of patches) on a greater range of systems than many would have believed possible just a short time ago. Recently, every mobile store (Apple, Android…) was found to have nefarious software that had to be exercised. Mobile developers need to be ever more vigilant, not just about the code they write but the libraries they use.

5. Predictive Analytics

Context is king and the use of analytics to increase the understanding of the situation and possible responses is going to continue to expand. As capabilities advance, only our imagination will hold this area back from increasing where and when mobile devices become useful. Unfortunately, the same can be said about the security issues that are based on using predictive analytics.

6. Changing business models

Peer to peer solutions continue to be the rage but with the capabilities listed above, whole new approaches to value generation are possible. There will always be early adopters who are willing to play with these and with the deeper understanding possibilities today new approaches to crossing the chasm will be demonstrated.

It should be an interesting year…

IT opportunities and cruising…

cruiseI recently went on a western Caribbean cruise on Royal Caribbean. This is the first cruise I’d been on in a couple of years and I found it interesting how much mobile device use there was on the boat. Everything from folks checking emails… to live streaming at the breakfast table (at an additional cost, of course). There still seemed to be numerous more subtle ways to enhance the cruise experience now that nearly everyone has an enhanced device.

There is an anecdote about cruising that for every couple that gets on a cruise, one of them doesn’t really want to be there. That’s probably a bit strong, but what’s true is that there are numerous activities going on at any one time and finding the right one to interest you could be improved.

I could easily see adding NFC or low power Bluetooth spots throughout the ship that personal devices could tap into for service information or even historic facts/trivia. As I drive across the country, I see numerous historic spot signs along the highway that’s because some people are interested in what’s happened at locations in the past. Adding some capabilities to share that information for the ship would be interesting:  where items of specific interest (music performers/performances, celebrity spotting, changes in ship design over the years) could be broadcast. It would make for an interesting gamification,  scavenger hunt and Pokémon Go like possibilities that would interest some on board.

Analytic data from IoT and business process systems could be shared to optimize the experience. For example, sharing how long the wait may be at “my time” dining. A news feed capability may be useful, so you can subscribe to information about where the ship is or when it will get into port. Naturally there will be a great deal of opportunity available to upsell passengers on jewelry, drinks, excursions… as well.

There may be some interesting peer-to-peer sharing experiences. The one I’ve thought about for a long time is: allowing folks to share their skills and interests so they could be notified if someone within 50 feet is an author/expert on a topic of interest. Or enable ad-hoc meetings, like in the case of our cruise where there was a quilting, veteran and Victorian dance group, that would have a public meeting at a specific time and place. These capabilities would encourage interactions with other passengers that they wouldn’t normally experience. These capabilities would have to be opt in though, to allow those who want to get away to have that experience as well.

The use of augmented reality also seems like a missed opportunity. An app to take some of the signpost information mentioned earlier and enhance it with directional information. This could help lead you to the experience you’d like to have, rather than the one you just settle for, based on what you know.

What I am getting at is: different people want a range of experiences on a cruise and its seems like there are numerous opportunities being missed by both the passengers and the cruise lines to make the most of the occasion, with relatively little additional effort. There are some significant privacy and customer satisfaction concerns, but I am sure a range of pilots would quickly point out the issues and possibilities.

Waste can be Good – it’s all relative

AbundanceAs businesses makes the transition to where the edge of the enterprise is wired into the operational processes of the business, we will start to consume our resources quite differently than we have in the past. We can use the abundance of computing capabilities to shed light on all the dark data currently available to develop a deeper contextual understanding of situations we encounter. Money may not be growing on trees, but there is much more we can be doing.

An article in Wired magazine back in 2009 discussed how: Tech Is Too Cheap to Meter: It’s Time to Manage for Abundance, Not Scarcity. In this world of exponential increases in capability, 2009 is ancient history, even so, the article is useful. It works through examples like how Alan Kay used the precious resources of the computer to display pictures on the screen instead of just textual data. George Gilder called this “wasting transistors” — making people more productive by using the transistors (computing capability) available.

The funny thing about waste is that it’s all relative to your sense of scarcity.

As we look to use higher levels of automation to handle more “normal” activities and focus people’s attention to turning anomalies into opportunities, we’ll use pattern recognition and other techniques that may appear to waste cycles. I hear people today complain about the expense of cloud computing and that it is out of control. That is more about what they use these resources for, how they measure impact and exercise control than anything to do with cost, at least from my perspective. As more capabilities become available and algorithms improve, we’ll need to do even more with more – not less.

The Wired article shows how behavior needs to change as we move from a perspective of scarcity to abundance:

From a perspective of Scarcity or Abundance

Scarcity Abundance
Rules Everything is forbidden unless it is permitted Everything is permitted unless it is forbidden
Social model Paternalism (We know what’s best) Egalitarianism (You know what’s best)
Profit plan Business model We’ll figure it out
Decision process Top-down Bottom-up
Organizational structure Command and control Out of control

This kind of shift in perspective is disruptive, useful and the right thing to do to take maximum advantage of a truly scarce resource – the human attention span.