Fusion 360 for woodworkers – session 9 (drawings)

This 9th session focuses on creating 2D drawings from 3D models.

Sometimes you need a 2D drawing to document your design. This session covers the highlights of how to get this done.

The PDF for session 9 can be found here.

Screencast for the session

If you have gone through all 9 sessions, you should have at least a foundation for using Fusion 360 for woodworking. As I mentioned at the start, there is so much more capability than can be covered in any session and many resources available on-line.

Sessions:

  1. An overview of the user interface
  2. Creating a sketch with a line and a shape, as well as an introduction to parameters and constraints
  3. Bodies and components
  4. Fusion tips and copying design elements
  5. Creating a lap joint and using parametric design
  6. Parametric driven table base design
  7. Mortis and Tenon, putting top on the table
  8. Dovetails and using Revolve to create a pawn
  9. Generating drawings

Good luck

Fusion 360 for woodworkers – session 7

This 7th session builds on the previous sessions and focuses on:

  • Review the table base made for session 6 homework
  • Create a tenon
  • Create a filet
  • Create a mortis
  • Adding a mortis and tenon to the table base
  • Adding the table top

The PDF for session 7 can be found here.

Screencast for making a mortis and tenon.

This will be the last session post for a week since I’ve now caught up with the synchronized sessions in our shop.

Fusion 360 for woodworkers – session 1

During this social distancing opportunity, I’ve not been posting much lately. One of the reasons was I’ve been working on a getting started set of sessions for using Fusion 360. This is the tool I’ve been using for most of my CNC work.

This CAD package has many capabilities and a free hobbyist license. Since SketchUp moved away from a hobbyist desktop version to a web-based approach, moving to a more powerful tool seemed to be a wise thing to do. I can only hope that Fusion 360 doesn’t follow a similar route…

There are MANY Fusion 360 videos out on YouTube and numerous web sites covering the topic as well. Since I was putting together a series of sessions for our woodshop on Fusion 360 using a synchronous collaboration (Zoom), I thought I share the support presentation materials here as well.

There will be a post summarizing each sessions with a link to a PDF covering the material. As of now, there will be 9 sessions in all. Each one will have a bit of homework to cover before the next session. The goal is for the woodworkers to have a working knowledge of Fusion, not to turn them into a designer – I’ll leave that as an exercise for the student. A power and issue with Fusion is there are so many ways to do something.  I don’t claim that the examples included are the best possible, but hope they prove to be a useful example (even a bad example is still an example).

The session outline is (by session #):

  1. An overview of the user interface
  2. Creating a sketch with a line and a shape, as well as an introduction to parameters and constraints
  3. Bodies and components
  4. Fusion tips and copying design elements
  5. Creating a lap joint and using parametric design
  6. Parametric driven table base design
  7. Mortis and Tenon, putting top on the table
  8. Dovetails and using Revolve to create a pawn
  9. Generating drawings

As I get feedback, I try to update the slides, as well as provide additional Screencasts, if the updates will enhance the understanding. This updating effort will hopefully make this a training resource for our shop, so I don’t have to give the class synchronously again and can just response to questions…

The first session PDF can be found here.

A new engraving project – Hufflepuff

Now that the 3D printer is operational again, I needed something else to tackle. So I dusted off the CNC machine — literally.

My daughter is into Harry Potter and has taken the test to determine she is a Hufflepuff. I had sitting around so I thought I would cut out the Hufflepuff crest. Here is what the crest is supposed to look like:

Hufflepuff crest

I only had Poplar available, so ended up creating this:

6″ wooden Hufflepuff crest

Poplar has long fibers and is not all that hard of a wood, so it did not come out as nice as I would have liked. This piece has no real sanding to clean up the edges, but that is easily addressed.

I used a 1mm flat bit to clear away the open areas to a depth of 2mm and a 60 degree V bit for the edges and detail. Overall, I deem the design a success. The next problem is determining how to finish it or to start over with some Maple or other more appropriate wood.