Action as a services moving forward…

action 002Had to laugh when I saw this post from Forrester titled: “Big Data” Has Lost Its Zing – Businesses Want Insight And Action since this is a song I’ve been singing for a number of years now. The first post about this I could identify was back in 2007.

Big data efforts should be measured in time-to-action, not time-to-insight. IT organizations need to be defining, developing and deploying systems of action.

To quote myself: “the organizations that can understand “normal” and focus the people on the areas that need their creativity will shine in the end. This relationship between situational awareness and automation needs to be part of organizational strategic planning, much more than what most architectural processes allow.”

Glad to see that analysts are recognizing this.

In a security breach, the perspective of whose responsible is shifting…

securityThe implications of boards holding Chief Executive Officers accountable for breaches will be something to watch. Recently a survey of 200 public companies shows that corporate boards are now concerned about cybersecurity and willing to hold top executives accountable.

Since the board (and the CEO that they put in place) is ultimately responsible for the results of the company, making the CEO responsible shouldn’t be a surprise.  A security breach is just one example of a business risk. not just a “technical issue,” so it should be treated in a similar fashion.  There are roles like the CISOs, CIOs, CROs that may support the CEO in their efforts to steer the ship, but if the organization runs aground, the highest levels of corporate leadership need to be held accountable — just like they are rewarded for improved corporate performance. Neither scenario is accomplished by the CEO alone.

A data breach can impact customer confidence, stock price, and the company’s reputation for a long time and those are not “technical issues.” Unfortunately, it is not a matter of “if” but “when” a security incident will occur so a formal effort must be expended to anticipate, detect, develop contingency plans to limit, and correct the situation when it occurs, as quickly and effectively as possible, reducing the impact on the customers as well as the organization itself.

That is likely one reason why in job postings today there are an abundance of openings in the security space.

The future of work…

working at a deskFast Company had a thought provoking post on The New Rules of Work – What Work Will Look Like in 2025. The focus of the article is on the technology enhanced human, enhanced by offloading many of the mundane elements of work on automation. Some of those elements (like recognizing faces) may weaken some of our mental faculties but the automation of other areas will likely refine our skills.

One statement that holds true today though is:

Workers will need to engage in lifelong education to remain on top of how job and career trends are shifting to remain viable in an ever-changing workplace

There is also a few expressed that the automation could eliminate bias from the hiring process. Personally, I doubt that since it would just codify the bias into the selection algorithm through the encoded selection criteria. Granted it may not bias based upon race or gender, but for those who really want a diverse set of perspectives in their workforce employee selection will still be difficult to do well.

One of the best elements of this article though is the number of links to other material on a range of topics. There were a number of links related to the topic of the redefinition of retirement.

In any case the workplace and the type of work being performed will be shifting and this article is food for thought.

DARPA breakthrough technologies report for 2015

Future signBack in March, DARPA released their latest vision for the future. I hadn’t really seen much coverage of it after that so I thought I’d share it.

There were four technologies areas highlighted:

  • Rethink Complex Military Systems: DARPA is looking to make weapons systems more modular and easily upgraded and improved. Likely similar to the architectural and design decisions being made in most businesses today.
  • Master the Information Explosion: DARPA is developing technologies to ensure that the data and systems with which critical decisions are made are trustworthy so they are looking at methods to create fundamentally more secure systems. They are also investigating the growing need to ensure privacy at various levels of need without losing the national security value that comes from appropriate access to networked data. Once again not all that different from the discussions taking place in most businesses today.
  • Harness Biology as Technology: Leveraging breakthroughs in neuroscience, immunology, genetics and related fields, DARPA in 2014 created its Biological Technologies Office. There has been success withneural implants and prosthetic limbs, and they plan on building from there.  DARPA’s work in this area includes programs to accelerate progress in synthetic biology, outpace the spread of infectious diseases and master new neurotechnologies. Not exactly at the core of every business but those in bio-tech are definitely looking here too.
  • Expand the Technological Frontier: DARPA is working on basic research to achieve new capabilities by applying deep mathematics; inventing new chemistries, processes and materials; and harnessing quantum physics. This is one area where government level funding makes a long-lasting impact where eventually the entire economy may benefit.

Although some information is not applicable to everyone, those interested in thinking about the future of their businesses should give this document a look.

And not Or

and not or (logic)I was in an exchange the other day with some folks talking about their perspective that all companies need to be using cloud computing. I agree, but my view is slightly different. My perspective is that depending on the company’s size, needs and applications they will likely continue to have in house systems. It’s not a choice between things, but a choice among things and an acceptance of the way things are and one answer doesn’t meet everyone’s needs. You can’t look at it as: clouds the answer, now what’s the question?

Mobile computing is similar. It is the future interface of the enterprise, not really something special anymore. Embracing mobile devices and cloud computing will have a game changing effect, but it is not about the infrastructure but what we do with them and people want to do those things everywhere.

There are a number of other trends taking place like the IoT that are also shifting how organizations think about computing. It is interesting how this term is changing and how various organizations are trying to name it. It used to be ubiquitous computing, some call it ambient computing, but most still use the Internet of Things.

In any case the aggregation of sensors, devices, intelligence, and agents will shift how organizations generate value and shift IT to focus on systems of action.

Internet of Things Units Installed Base by Category (in Millions)

 Category 2013 2014 2015 2020
Automotive 96.0 189.6 372.3 3,511.1
Consumer 1,842.1 2,244.5 2.874.9 13,172.5
Generic Business 395.2 479.4 623.9 5,158.6
Vertical Business 698.7 836.5 1,009.4 3,164.4
Grand Total 3,032.0 3,750.0 4,880.6 25,006.6

Source: Gartner (November 2014)

Many still look at these opportunities primarily from an infrastructure perspective, but I definitely do not. It is about the business and the hardware side is a small (but necessary) part. Organizations that will compete effectively in the coming years are going to shift their thinking to “and” and not “or” foundation. It is not all about IT, but IT has a role in enabling this flexibility.

By the way the output of the And not Or logic circuit illustration is always a one –> true.

Automation and leadership

automation2One topic that has been getting people excited over the last few years is that robots are going to replace many jobs or make some jobs much more boring. That is not even touching on the whole autonomous robot rebellion crowd’s concerns (I posted about an AI risks related podcast on NPR just last week).

Robotics is taking important roles ranging from milking cows, to working in kitchens, to logistics and order fulfillment. Now they are taking on more important functions in our business processes that used to be the domain of knowledge workers (even though it is happening slowly).

I do believe that the increased use of automation should shift how enterprises architects think about the enterprise and how that environment is structured. Automation is just another enterprise resource that needs to be defined, understood and optimized. The leaders are going to have to include these possibilities in their thought processes too.

These changes are inevitable. That got me thinking about a post that McKinsey put out about beating the transformation odds – after all automation efforts will be a transformation. Most of the article focused on the need for executive vision, clarity and communications. It also discussed the need for continuous improvement as part of the plan. Too often teams and breathe a sense of relief once a project is deployed, when in reality that is just point where it was given birth and now needs to develop and mature. Automation efforts are no exception.

Transformation is hard work, and the changes made during the transformation process must be sustained for the organization to keep improving.