Nine questions to ask during a strategic shift

questionsI was talking with someone the other day about a strategic change they were contemplating and what it takes to adopt a new approach, strategy or tool. They were looking for guidance on the issues that might disrupt their efforts. Rather than just answer the question specifically, I thought about it from a process perspective and attempted to answer their need more generally:

Nine questions that will help improve your understanding of the impact and implications of events that may disrupt your plans. This approach attempts to look at the issues from the outside in.

  1. What is happening today? Look for the events or cultural trends that support or imped the change you’re trying to make. We have lots of examples today of cultural disruption and individuals being blindsided by cultural perspective, learn from their mistakes.
  2. What does it mean for others? Look at how the change will be viewed. In many cases perception is reality. Will others really need your solution?? What will it take to keep up with demand, when they do???
  3. What does it mean for you and your team? What are your motivations and will they sustain you through the entire process of change – making a change can be lonely.
  4. What needs to happen first? Every change requires a bit of triage. You can’t eat the elephant whole, so where would you start to increase your likelihood of success.
  5. What does it take to be a change agent? Unfortunately, just because you want to do something different, you will not necessarily be ordained by others as someone to follow. Do you have a vision?? Do you have the relationships needed to initiate the change??? No person is an island. To be a leader, you must have followers.
  6. Do you know what needs to be done next? Change of almost any size requires a plan. We already looked at what needs to be done first, can we make an unstoppable train of events that will carry the change through to completion – plan on it. Also look for measures of success so you can adjust along the way.
  7. When is the solution needed, is this the right time? Every change has an optimal time for it to take place. If now is (or is not) the time – why??
  8. Who will be affected? It is as important to understand who will be crushed under the wheels of progress, as who will be elevated by the change. Thinking about the implications of all the affected parties will greatly improve your plan and its effectiveness.
  9. How much investment will be needed? I’ve kept this until the end, not that funding isn’t important but based on the fact that if you haven’t thought about these others issues you probably only have a vague notion of what it will take to be successful. If you have the right camp of supporters, it can significantly reduce your funding needs. Similarly, if you’re going after the wrong market or don’t have the right kinds of support, no amount of funding will make your efforts successful.

There are likely some gaps in this thought process, but this approach been helpful over the years, maybe it will be useful to you too.

“If you want to make God laugh, tell him about your plans.” – Woody Allen

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IoT triggering some thoughts

A few weeks ago, I mentioned my initial foray into IoT for the home.  I now have my Ring Doorbell installed and a few Wemo switches.

It wasn’t hard to do and with IFTTT integration I can set up actions for numerous triggers like:

  • Turning on the lights at sunset
  • Log when someone comes to the door in a spreadsheet
  • Turn on the house lights when my phone is getting close to home
  • Use Google assistant to do a variety of things

My only complaint is that IFTTT is a bit slow in recognizing a triggering event (like motion) from the Ring doorbell. It takes a minute or more for the action to occur.

It is great that I can have my devices talk to each other, I just wish there was a bit more for them to say. A number of years ago I put together the following illustration:

IoT Value

It seems that IoT is like Metcalfe’s law for the internet:  the value generated is  proportional to the square of the number of connected devices in the system. The one thing that’s true though is that there are more devices with more interfaces all the time.

IoT starts to come home

Over the years, I’ve played around with a few IoT solutions. Sunday, I decided to seriously tackle some outdoor lighting, by replacing one of my light switches with one that can be controlled from the Internet.

372.jpgI looked at a number of solutions and found that there are surprisingly few that will replace a 3-way switch (in fact the only 3-way switch I found was from GE and then I would need a controller…). After looking at my requirements, it appeared I only needed normal light switches and the one I chose was the Belkin Wemo® Light Switch. Fortunately, my house was already wired with switches that looked fairly similar, so my wife was happy with the result.

Thanks to Amazon same day delivery, the new switch was at my house at 6PM on Sunday.

I had it unboxed, wired in and controlled by IFTTT in under an hour. So now I can control when the light go on and off automatically and can turn them on manually from my phone. Not bad… for an hours work.

I have a few more projects that I am planning to do around the house, so I’ll write about those too, as well as anything I learn along the way. An example setting up a dedicated wireless LAN just for the IoT devices (to localize any security issues).

World Amateur Radio Day

Every April 18, radio amateurs worldwide take to the airwaves in celebration of World Amateur Radio Day. It was on that day in 1925 that the International Amateur Radio Union was formed in Paris.

From the 25 countries that formed the IARU in 1925, the IARU has grown to include 160 member-societies in three regions. IARU Region 1 includes Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and Northern Asia. Region 2 covers the Americas, and Region 3 is comprised of Australia, New Zealand, the Pacific island nations, and most of Asia. The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) has recognized the IARU as representing the interests of Amateur Radio.

Though some may wonder about the value of Amateur Radio in this age of the Internet, there are actually more ham radio operators in the US (graph from 2014) than at any time in the past — thanks to interests in disaster preparedness, the maker movement and a variety of service functions that the hobby provides.