Another update to QSOSender3

Back in June I wrote a post about releasing an update to QSOSender3 — an application for Android that simulates ham radio QSOs using Morse code. I had some requests for additional functionality and noticed a few odd user interface and grammatical behaviors by the program, so I’ve released a new version of QSOSender3.

This version will allow you to paste in text or save generated QSOs to retrieve later. I received a request by someone to add this functionality since somehow they used the program during contests, so I thought “why not?” The program can now store four text fields worth of information. I wonder if anyone will try and read a short story in Morse, if so they are better than me.

I can’t imaging what else the users of the program may want, but people keep sending in requests so I try to address them.

Advertisements

Update to Morse Code training for Android

antennaI wrote a program that simulated conversations between hams (QSOs) to help improve Morse code skillsQSOSender3. Believe it or not, Morse code is as popular now as it has ever been, in amateur radio.

QSOSender3 has a 5 out of 5 rating in the Play Store and has been installed on almost a thousand Android devices. It’s useful, since the code you hear on the air is usually quite different than what practice programs provide.

I received a request the other day to support the Farnsworth method, so something close to that has now been added and the program released on the Google Play store. If you find any other features you’d like to see added, let me know.

It will not help with field day this year, but may improve your skills for the future.

 

 

Morse code activity

Though my skills with Morse code are not as strong as they used to be, it doesn’t stop me from leveraging it with my other hobbies:

Every once in a while, I have the opportunity to play World of Warships — sometimes with my son who lives many states away. Besides being a challenging, multi-player naval simulation, WoW often provides some history on the ships and men it is based on.

Their latest background post had just a bit on the background of Morse code and its use by the various Navys of the world  – Squall line: Morse code.

It can be strange how various parts of your life can intersect.

The portable ‘shack’ in the field — and the need for a keyer

I took the completed portable shack that I’ve been working on into the field last weekend. It was all setup and working in about 15 minutes. I was on for about 4 hours on 17 meters and talked to about 15 contacts across 3 countries on SSB. I was focused more on playing with the settings and options than actually making contacts so I was pleased with the performance, overall.

I did realize there was one thing I wished I had and that was a disposable iambic keyer. I have a nice keyer at home for sending Morse code, but there was no way I was leaving it in my portable shack box or (more likely) forgetting it at home so it wasn’t there when I need it. Once again, it was time to call on the 3D printer.

keyI came up with a design fairly quickly that used about a dollar’s worth of spare parts I had lying around and half a hacksaw blade. I printed out a couple of samples to refine the model. By the time I had the second one done, I declared victory and now have a small iambic keyer. It is a simple keyer without squeeze functionality, though there are some designs out there that do that. The only real refinement I’d make is to create a tunnel in the base to run the wire through, rather than using a zip tie on the post where I screw down the hacksaw blade. We’ll see if it is ‘good enough’ in the field, next time. I’ll likely screw it into my clipboard.

If you are interested in the iambic keyer design, I uploaded it to: thingiverse

Some people probably find it hard to believe that there are still folks that operate CW, but it has its own challenges and can get the message through when little else can. I used to operate CW a great deal, but am a bit rusty now. We’ll see if having a keyer like this helps.

#amateurradio #hamradio