What’s the real outcome of Salesforce’s AI predictions?

automated decisionsYesterday. I was catching up on my technology email and came across this post stating that Salesforce now powers over 1B predictions every day for its customers. That’s a pretty interesting number to throw out there, but it makes me ask “so what?” How are people using these predictions to make greater business impact.

The Salesforce website states:

“Einstein is a layer of artificial intelligence that delivers predictions and recommendations based on your unique business processes and customer data. Use those insights to automate responses and actions, making your employees more productive, and your customers even happier. “

Another ‘nice’ statement. Digging into the material a bit more Einstein (the CRM AI functions from Salesforce) appears to provide analysis of previous deals and if a specific opportunity is likely to be successful, helping to prioritize your efforts. It improves the presentation of information with some insight into what it means. It appears to be integrated into the CRM system that the users are already familiar with.

For a tool that has been around since the fall of 2016, especially one that is based on analytics… I had difficulty finding any independent quantitative analysis of the impact. Salesforce did have a cheatsheet with some business impact analysis of the AI solution (and blog posts), but no real target market impact to provide greater context – who are these metrics based on.

It may be that I just don’t know where to look, but it does seem like a place for some deeper analysis and validation. The analysts could be waiting for other vendor’s solutions to compare against.

In the micro view, organizations that are going to dive into this pool will take a more quantitative approach, defining their past performance, expectations and validate actuals against predictions. That is the only way a business can justify the effort and improve. It is not sufficient to just put the capabilities out there and you’re done.

It goes back to the old adage:

“trust, but verify”

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